REFERENCES:

 

  • Ben-Michael J. (2005). Dog owner in problematic dog-rearing situations: Techniques of disciplining behavior. Print Partners Ipskamp, The Netherlands.
     

  • Berns G.S., Brooks A.M. & Spivak M. (2015). Scent of the familiar: An fMRI study of canine brain responses to familiar and unfamiliar human and dog odors. Behavioral Processes, 110, 37-46.
     

  • between dogs obtained as puppies from pet stores and those obtained from noncommercial breeders. JAVMA, 242, 10, 1359-1363.
     

  • Blacksaw J.K. (1991). An overview of types of aggressive behavior in dogs and methods of treatment. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 30, 351-361.
     

  • Blouin D.D. (2008). All in the Family: Understanding the meaning of dogs and cats in the lives of American Pet Owners. Department of Sociology, Indiana University, USA.
     

  • Briton N.J. & Hall J.A. (1995). Beliefs About Female and Male Nonverbal Communication. Sex Roles, 32, 1/2, 79-90.
     

  • Brooks A., Schouten B., Troje N.F., et al. (2008). Correlated changes in perceptions of the gender and orientation of ambiguous biological motion figures. Current Biology, 18, 17, 728-729.
     

  • Butter A.P., Thompson B., Strasser R. et al. (2015). Evidence for a synchronization of hormonal states between humans and dogs during competition. Physiology & Behavior, 147. 54-62.
     

  • Carballo F., Freidin E., Putrino N., et al. (2015). Dog’s Discrimination of Human Selfish and Generous Attitudes: The Role of Individual Recognition, Experience, and Experimenters’ Gender. PLoS ONE, 10, 2, 1-22.
     

  • Christiansen K. & Knussmann R. (1987). Androgen levels and components of aggressive behavior in men. Hormones and Behaviour, 21, 2, 170-180.
     

  • Coppola C.L., Grandin T. & Enns R.M. (2006). Human interaction and cortisol: Can human contact reduce stress for shelter dogs?. Physiology and Behavior, 87, 3, 537-541.
     

  • D’Aniello B., Semin G.R., Alterisio A., et al. (2017). Interspecies transmission of emotional information via chemo signals: from humans to dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). Animal Cognition, 1-12.
     

  • De Groot J. (2015). Chemosignaling Emotions: What a Smell can Tell. Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
     

  • De Groot J.H.B., Semin G.R. & Smeets M.A.M. (2017). On the Communicative Function of Body Odors: A Theoretical Integration and Review. Perspectives on Psychological Science.12, 2, 183-204.
     

  • De Groot J.H.B., Smeets M.A.M., Kalderwaij A., et al. (2012). Chemosignals Communicate Human Emotions. Psychological Science, 23, 11, 1417-1424.
     

  • Doring D., Roscher A., Scheipl F., et al. (2009). Fear-related behavior of dogs in veterinary practice. The Veterinary Journal, 182, 1, 38-43.
     

  • Dotson M.J. (2008). Understanding dog–human companionship. Journal of Business Research, 61, 5, 457-466.
     

  • Dykman R.A., Murphree O.D., & Reese W.G., (1979). Familial Anthropophobia in Pointer Dogs?. Gen Psychiatry, 36, 9, 988–993.
     

  • Farago T., Pongracz P., Range F. et al. (2010). ‘The bone is mine’: affective and referential aspects of dog growls. Animal Behavior, 79, 4, 917-925.
     

  • Filiatre J.C., Millot J.L. & Eckerlin A. ( 1991). Behavioral Variability of Olfactory Exploration of the Pet Dog in Relation to Human Adults. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 30, 341-350.
     

  • Gacsi M., Topal J., Miklosi A., et al. (2001). Attachment Behaviours of Adult Dogs (Canis familiaris) Living at Shelters. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 115, 4, 423-431.
     

  • Gunrow W. (1995). Fearfulness and failure in training working dogs. SJSU ScholarWorks,
     

  • Guy N.C., Luescher U.A., Dohoo S.E, et al. (2001). Risk factors for dog bites to owners in a general veterinary caseload. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 74, 29-42.
     

  • Guy N.C., Luescher U.A., Dohoo S.E., et al. (2001). Demographic and aggressive characteristics of dogs in a general veterinary caseload. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 74, 1, 15-28.
     

  • Győri B. Gácsi M. & Miklósi A. (2010). Friend or foe: Context dependent sensitivity to human behaviour in dogs. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 128, 1-4, 69-77.
     

  • Handlin L., Nilsson A., Edjeback M., et al. (2012). Associations between the Psychological Characteristics of the Human–Dog Relationship and Oxytocin and Cortisol Levels. Anthrozoos, 25, 2, 215-228.
     

  • Hastings H.D. (2014). Not Just a Silly Voice: Dogs Respond to Motherese but Wolves Do Not. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado, 54.
     

  • Hennessy M.B., Davis H.N., Williams M.T., et al. (1997). Plasma Cortisol Levels of dogs at a county animal shelter. Behavior., 62, 485-490.
     

  • Hennessy M.B., Voith V.L., Young T.L., et al. (2002). Exploring Human Interaction and Diet Effects on the Behavior of Dogs in a Public Animal Shelter. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, 5, 4, 253-273.
     

  • Hennessy M.B., Williams M.T., Miller D.D., et al. (1998). Influence of Male and Female Petters on Plasma Cortisol and Behavior: Can Human Interaction Reduce the Stress of Dogs in a Public Animal Shelter?. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 61:1, 63-77.
     

  • Herzog H.A. (2007). Gender Differences in Human–Animal Interactions: A Review. Anthrozoos, 20, 1.
     

  • Horváth Z., Dóka A. & Miklósi A. (2008). Affiliative and disciplinary behavior of human handlers during play with their dog affects cortisol concentrations in opposite directions. Hormones and Behavior, 54, 107-114.
     

  • Hsu Y. & Sun L. (2010). Factors associated with aggressive responses in pet dogs. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 123,108–123.
     

  • International Research Findings. Early Childhood Education Journal [online].
     

  • Jagoe A. (1994). Behavior problems in the domestic dog: a retrospective and prospective study to identify factors influencing their development. Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine and St. Catharine’s College, University of Cambridge, UK.
     

  • Jalongo M.R. (2015). An Attachment Perspective on the Child–Dog Bond: Interdisciplinary and

  • Jezierski T., Sobczyn M., Walczak M., et al. (2012). Do Trained Dogs Discriminate Individual Body Odors of Women Better than Those of Men?. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 57, 3, 647-563.
     

  • Kirsch P., Esslinger C., Chen Q., et al., (2005). Oxytocin Modulates Neural Circuitry for Social Cognition and Fear in Humans. The Journal of Neuroscience, 25, 49, 11489-11493.
     

  • Kis A., Hern´adi A., Kanizs´ar O., et al. (2014). Oxytocin induces positive expectations about ambivalent stimuli (cognitive bias) in dogs. Hormones and Behavior, 69, 1-7.
     

  • Koolhas J.M., Korte S.M., Van der Vegt B.J., et al. (1999).Coping styles in animals: current status in behavior and stress-physiology. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 23, 7, 925-935.
     

  • Kubinyi E., Turcsán B. & Miklósi A. (2009). Dog and owner demographic characteristics and dog personality trait associations. Behavioral Processes, 81, 392-401.
     

  • Landsberg G., Hunthausen W. & Ackerman L., (2012). Behavior Problems of the Dog and Cat. Saunders, Elsevier, 3rd
     

  • London K.B. (2011). Understanding and helping fearful dogs. Bark, Feb ‘11, 72-78.
     

  • Lore R.K. & Eisenberg F.B. (1986). Avoidance reactions of domestic dogs to unfamiliar male and female humans in a kennel setting. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 15, 3, 261-266.
     

  • Lore R.K. & Eisenberg F.B. (1986). Avoidance reactions of domestic dogs to unfamiliar male and female humans in a kennel setting. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 15, 261–266.
     

  • Lynn R. & Martin T. (1997). Gender Differences in Extraversion, Neuroticism and Psychoticism in 27 Nations. The Journal of Social Psychology, 137, 3, 369-373.
     

  • Majumder S.S. & Bhadra A. (2015). When Love Is in the Air: Understanding Why Dogs Tend to Mate when It Rains. PLoS ONE, 10, 12.
     

  • Maritia C. , Gazzanoa A. , Lansdown Moore J. et al. (2012). Perception of dogs’ stress by their owners. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 7, 213-129.
     

  • McMillan F.D., Serpell J.A., Duffy D.L., et al. (2013). Differences in behavioral characteristics
     

  • Miller S.C., Kennedy C., DeVoe D., et al. (2009). An Examination of Changes in Oxytocin Levels in Men and Women Before and After Interaction with a Bonded Dog. Anthrozoos, 22, 1, 31-42.
     

  • Mitsui S., Yamamoto M., Nagawasa M. (2011). Urinary oxytocin as a noninvasive biomarker of positive emotion in dogs. Hormones and Behavior, 60, 3, 239-243.
     

  • Morisaki A., Takaoka A. & Fujita K. (2009). Are dogs sensitive to the emotional state of humans?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 4, 2, 49.
     

  • Mortensen C.D. (2008). Communication Theory: Second Edition. Transaction Publishers, USA.
     

  • Mujika-Parodi L.M., Strey H.H., Frederick B., et al. (2009). Chemosensory Cues to Conspecific Emotional Stress Activate Amygdala in Humans. PLoS ONE, 4, 7, e6415.
     

  • Mutic, ParmaV., Brünner V.F., et al. (2016). You Smell Dangerous: Communicating Fight Responses Through Human Chemo signals of Aggression. Chemical Senses, 41, 1, 35–43.
     

  • Nagasawa M., Kikusui T., Onaka T., et al. (2009). Dog’s gaze at its owner increases owner’s urinary oxytocin during social interaction. Hormones and Behavior, 55, 434-441.
     

  • Nagasawa M., Mitsui S., En S. et al. (2015). Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds. Science, 348, 6232, 333-336.
     

  • Nagasawa M., Mitsui S., En S. et al. (2015). Oxytocin-gaze positive loop and the coevolution of human-dog bonds. Science, 348, 6232, 333-336.
     

  • Night Talker, the. (2017). Dog Catcher versus social worker: which career pays the most?. Adelaide Homeless Journal, Adelaide, Australia.
     

  • Odendaal J. S. J. & Lehmann S.M.C, (2000). The Role of Phenylethylamine during Positive Human-Dog Interaction. Acta Vet. Brno, 69, 183-188.
     

  • Oliva J.L., Rault J.L., Appleton B. & et al. (2014). Oxytocin enhances the appropriate use of human social cues by the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) in an object choice task. Anim Cogn [online].
     

  • Overall K.L. & Love M. (2001).Dog bites to humans—demography, epidemiology, injury, and risk. JAVMA, 218, 12, 1923-1934.
     

  • Payne E., Bennett P.C. & McGreevy P.D. (2015). Current perspectives on attachment and bonding in the dog–human dyad. Psychology Research and Behavior Management, 8, 71-79.
     

  • Pirrone F., Pierantoni L., Mazzola S.M., et al. (2015). Owner and Animal Factors Predict the Incidence of, and Owner Reaction Towards, Problem Behaviors in Companion Dogs. Journal of Veterinary Behavior [manuscript].
     

  • Podbersceka A.L. & Serpell J.A. (1997). Environmental influences on the expression of aggressive behavior in English Cocker Spaniels. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 52, 3-4, 215-227.
     

  • Prato-Previde E., Fallani G. & Valsecchi P. (2006). Gender Differences in Owners Interacting with Pet Dogs: An Observational Study. Ethology: International Journal of Behavioral Biology. 112, 1, 64-73.
     

  • Reisner I.R. & Shofer F.S. (2008). Effects of gender and parental status on knowledge and attitudes of dog owners regarding dog aggression toward children. JAVMA, 233, 9, 1412-1419.
     

  • Reisner I.R., Houpt K.A. & Shofer F.S. (2005). National survey of owner-directed aggression in English Springer Spaniels. JAVMA, 227, 10, 1594-1603.
     

  • Reisner I.R., Nance M.L., Zeller J.S. et al. (2011). Behavioral Characteristics Associated with Dog Bites to Children Presenting to an Urban Trauma Centre. Injury Prevention, 17, 348-353.
     

  • Rezá P., Viziová P., Dobesová M. et al. (2011). Factors affecting dog–dog interactions on walks with their owners. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 134, 170-176.
     

  • Robinson I. (1995). The Waltham Book of Human-Animal Interaction: Benefits and Responsibilities of Pet Ownership. Elsevier Science, Oxford, UK.
     

  • San Jose State University, USA, 995.
     

  • Schilder M.B.H. & van der Borg J.A.M., (2004). Training dogs with help of the shock collar: short and long term behavioural effects. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 85, 319–334.
     

  • Schoberl I., Wedl M. & Bauer B., et al. (2015). Effects of Owner–Dog Relationship and Owner Personality on Cortisol Modulation in Human–Dog Dyads. Anthrozoos, 25, 2, 199-214.
     

  • Shiverdecker M.D., Schiml P.A. & Hennessy M.B. (2013). Human interaction moderates plasma cortisol and behavioral responses of dogs to shelter housing. Physiology & Behavior, 109, 75-79.
     

  • Skyes B. (2001). Understanding and Handling Dog Aggression, Crowood Press Ltd., Wiltshire.
     

  • Sommerville B.A. & Broom D.M. (2001).Olfactory Communication Between Man and Other Animals. Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 9, 467-471.
     

  • Sorge R.E., Martin L.J., Isbester K.A., et al. (2014).Olfactory exposure to males, including men, causes stress and related analgesia in rodents. Nature Methods, 11, 6, 629-634.
     

  • Taylor S.E. (2006). Tend and befriend biobehavioral bases of affiliation under stress. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 15, 6, 273–277.
     

  • Taylor S.E., Klein L.C., Lewis B.P., et al. (2000) Biobehavioral responses to stress in females: tend-and-befriend, not fight-or-flight. Psychological Review, 107, 3, 411-429.
     

  • Thompson D. (2014). What makes an aggressive dog, and how you can spot one. Health Day.
     

  • Thompson W.G. (2016). Pheromones' and an intermone that changes the physiology and behavior of anxious dogs. Testing the differences in four pheromone collars. A Thesis in Animal Science, Chapter IV, Texas Tech University, Texas.
     

  • Topal J., Kis A. & Olah K. (2014). Dogs’ Sensitivity to Human Ostensive Cues: A Unique Adaptation?. Social Cognition III, 12, 1-28.
     

  • Vas J., Topal J., Gacsi M., et al. (2005). A friend or an enemy? Dogs’ reaction to an unfamiliar person showing behavioral cues of threat and friendliness at different times. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 1-17.
     

  • Vas J., Topal J., Gacsi M., et al., (2005) A friend or an enemy? Dogs’ reaction to an unfamiliar person showing behavioral cues of threat and friendliness at different times. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 94, 99–115.
     

  • Vas J., Topal J., Gyori B., et al. (2007), Consistency of dogs’ reactions to threatening cues of an unfamiliar person. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 1-14.
     

  • Wayside Waifs Animal Behavior Team. (2014). Fear of New Family Members. Wayside Waifs Animal Behavior Team. Waiside Waifs, Inc.
     

  • Wedl M., Schöberl I., Bauer B., et al. (2010). Relational factors affecting dog social attraction to human partners. Interaction Studies, 11, 3, 482-503.
     

  • Wells D.L. & Hepper P.G. (1998). Male and Female Dogs Respond Differently to Men and Women. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 61, 341-349.
     

  • Wells D.L. & P.G. Hepper, (2000). Prevalence of behavior problems reported by owners of dogs purchased from an animal rescue shelter. Applied Animal Behavior Science, 69, 55–65.
     

  • Wyart C., Webster W.W., Chen J.H. et al. (2007). Smelling a single component of male sweat alters levels of cortisol in women. The Journal of Neuroscience, 27, 6, 1261-5.
     

  • Yong M.H. & Ruffman T. (2015).Domestic dogs match human male voices to faces, but not for females. Behavior, 152, 11,1585–1600.